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later. nothing could out do the flurry of excitement that hetty encountered the fall of 1860. this city shimmered with the news as the prince of wales was coming. a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society trimmed their moustaches women spent hours and at 9:00 p.m. friday october 12th couples who had paid $10 apiece arrived at the academy of music. men with white ties and women with hoopskirt its with brocade, sat tin, lead tools, gave special nods to precisely at 10:00 p.m. the orchestra played god save the queen and the small prints stepped into the room. nearly 3,000 of new york's finest citizens rushed to meet him and with the rash the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously the aghast rushed to follow they had lobster salad, pat day and filled glasses with champagne. at 2:00 with their dance floor fixed eager females waited their turn for a dance and finally the young woman was tapped. stunning in her low cut white gown with pink and her arms covered with long white gloves with ostrich feathers, it hetty was introduced to the prince of wales. and she said
without putting anything down. the city said you give you 1 acre of land for free to build a new home. of course, he relocated the property he did not have to pay for. he would of had to have the burden of every expense you would enter. this is the first mill skinner had it went up six months to the day of the flood. in holyoke. and ultimately skinners mill turned into that. the largest silk mill under one roof in the world. 1874, a success of this scope was impossible to imagine. and what what it would take to achieve that. 1874, skinner thought he was the head of his game. 49 years old, a wife, seven children, a village of 200 growing up around his mill, the head of the american soap trade, bullish on the pgm believed silk would become big business. it did. 87 before he thought how can i expand my business today? he would say what is the biggest room in the world? the room for improvement with 1874 he was looking to improve the business bullish on the future looking ahead. how could he become even better? with that i will read an excerpt from the book that i will take questions. i a
plantation. there were no villages and towns and cities in the north. in the north people could free slaves with opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work or for field hands and when the cotton gin was invented, and that absorbed all the slaves unskilled laborer and you now have i plantation owner, this rather cruel lower middle income people buying property in planting cotton prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves competed with them for jobs. but unlike most politicians come he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. >> he was the first to stand up and he led the fight turned his congressional career, which really began after his presidency. he failed to be really did to the presidency. you brought this up before because he didn't have the common touch. he believed it was the need for dignity of a presidential candidate to go stumping out in the countryside and make promises to people he knew he couldn't keep and unfortunately
places? >> i prefer to visit any place i write. "winter of the world" takes place in cities that are familiar to me. london, washington, berlin. event is petersburg into moscow. but a few places i haven't visited us got a chapter about the development of the atom bomb and a lot of that took place in new mexico and in particular was very exciting true story of espionage down in new mexico. santa fe apparently is crawling with fbi agents. everybody knew because they were all wearing tweed jackets. but anyway, there is some serious s. ganache going on, so that's great drama for me. so i just like to walk around the streets. i find that very helpful. >> i wondered when i came to the mirrors entry materials and buffalo issue actually went to buffalo. >> i went a couple of times to buffalo. the other thing is buffalo features than 100 years ago was a very different place from what it's like today. nevertheless i went there in the round, but i got a hold of old maps and the buffalo bluebook, which was the list of high society in town and at newspapers published at the time and so o
delivers the 22 manhattan institute lecture at the plaza hotel in new york city. it's a little over one hour. [applause] >> what a magnificent introduction. thank you to all of you here tonight. as thinking about a friend of mine, rest in peace, and harold when he accepted the nobel prize he wrote a rather scathing indictment of the west. i thought back to the time i was making a movie with harold and we were shooting in a white truffle chapel in a jewish neighborhood and he started reminiscing about his life when growing up over his uncle's radio shop -- he was reminiscing over growing up over his uncle's radio shop in the jewish area chapel and his magnificent radio actor voice became skittish to 1938 and his face lit up remembering those days growing up in the warmth of the jewish ghetto of london and i thought how could harold pinter done a great the west ha when if it weren't for the united states a free of virtue in london have been killed. i felt i was kind of odd coming in miles from rendering the intersection and the cultural upbringing and then i remembered thinking when harol
after the flood. it was taken apart piece by piece and transported on 25 railroad cars to the city of holyoke where he rebuilt. it is now a museum on the national register of historic places, and you can go and visit it and walk around it. this is an image of what was left of skinnerville after the disaster. and it's hard to imagine what it was like before. it was a thriving factory village filled with houses, trees, stone walls, farmland, and of course, skinner's silk mill. this right here is the foundation of what was, tsa all that was left of -- that's all that was left of the mill. and it extended far to the left of the familiar. this is skinner's house, you can see the front piazza has collapsed. this is an image that is the image on the cover of our book, my book, i should say. and there was no image, of course, of skinner's mill after the flood, because it was gone. so we had to choose one that represented the disaster. this is all that was left of a neighboring brass factory that was 600 feet long, or the length of almost two football fields. more devastation from the villa
conversations] >> we continue our live coverage from the national book awards here in new york city. this is one of the nominated books. "the boy kings of texas. " a memoir. domingo martinez is the awe their. mr. martinez now joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would
to another plantation. there were villages and towns and cities in the north come in and in the north people could read the slaves. there were opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and serve as apprentices and learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work was field hands, and then when it caught him chain was invented -- cotton shane was invented, you now have a sort of patrician of plantation owners. middle and lower-income people buying property and planting cotton. prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves compete for jobs. >> unlike most politicians he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. he was the first to stand up for emancipation and he led the fight throughout his congressional career which began after his presidency. he failed to be reelected and the presidency because he didn't have the common touch. he believed that there was beneath the dignity of a president shall candidate to go out in the countryside and make promises to people that he knew h
ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public with our open-door policy. so we bring the little rare -- literary world to albany. all these people's names and places and dates and events is are people who have come from far and wide to read to the general public here. and we had somewhere -- my most recent count is up to ten or probably eleven across the years ranging to tony morris who used to teach al albany to most recently the south african writer. and along the way -- or the caribbean writer derrick, or the irish poet. the names go on, but along the way, we archive all of by video and audio all the people that come through. we left the footprint, they left a footprint, and the institute was founded in 1983, officially became the new york state writers' institute in 1984 and over the years we've had more than a thousand writers through. >> my for was a raved are a vid conservative that actually worked at the convention. and she couldn't gate room, she ended up having to stay with me. and she brought a sign. she
assisted team for scholarship that america inner-city los them college of law. we all agree is a nationally recognized expert to also part of the legal team that successfully challenged the bush of ministration use of military tribunals in guantanamo bay, cuba. this co-editor. he has written a number of reports on a broad range of issues spill. he has won awards for scholarship and his service. he has been a senior editor at the peer review journal of foreign policy and the senior contributor to the. [indiscernible] which many of us, the first things we looked at in the morning. >> after? >> after. and a member of the court association of america. the clerk for the hon. warship berge john and barquette . and while a law student he was an editor from the yale law journal. i believe that is accredited. so as you can see, at two very talented. their debate is entitled to, detention policies. the way we set it up was we have -- in the book we will do it as live. steven will start and then will have great respond. >> great. thank you. it's a pleasure to be here. >> seven the fortitude to invite
guess some people try to make it harder. i was thinking, amelia earhart went from west cities around the equator or try to. i guess it was she trying to sort of -- i mean, i assume she was trying to do the most difficult thing. to give you -- did anyone ever go beyond that? she was looking to do something that was really difficult. >> yes, there have been increasingly vast aerial circumnavigation is for 1924, the first one done by a team from the u.s. army air corps, eight men and four planes. so that guaranteed somebody would finish. it was that dangerous. several other national teams trying to do it. the good news was, none of them were killed, but the best it -- bad news was not be finished. was quite difficult in the early open cockpit planes. you would feel the weather, whatever was, all the way around the world. so there were these attempts to go around and fly around the world. in fact, very quickly by the 1930's somebody does it within eight days which is kind of an amazing record. and it is hard to break that if you go faster it is not quite the endurance test of trying to k
goes to monticello to fit in the city even now, travels to lobby for the job, he was a burr loyalist. jefferson, not so much a loyalist as we know. i should quickly add one of these i say to my hamiltonian friends is at least my guy didn't get shot in jersey. [laughter] among the founders to have sent e-mails is alexander hamilton what thomas jefferson and one to get on the record and then move on if he's sitting there pleading his case and jefferson is looking sort of blow seng in that vaguely charming we had. he's not like fdr that you can leave. anyone that left his company thought he agreed with them. it's to get for the moment and not such a great way to get through the day as it turns out to he is my contact with davis and goes, grabs the fly it begins pulling apart. davis begins to realize that man of for quite as well as he hoped. a second story. there you have the man that can snap a fly, pulled apart and ferociously focused when he needs to be to read often making you thinking he is not focused. he traveled through. it was a couple of days' ride from monticello to washingto
human interhavings from the useful to the residual and the destructive. cities each have their own culture. in san francisco, a greeting to a stranger is likely to be returned n new york, ignored and in los angeles responded to with frigid rage. [laughter] likewise, of course, there's our beautiful american culture. it can be found most readily in our jokes, puns or illusions and the illusions of stand-up comedy or television commercials. they're the most powerful and cohesive. here's a great television commercial we saw at the super bowl. there's a holocaust of some time, a city's buried in rubble. later tough trucks of the manufacturer's brand emerge one by one, and the truck drivers get out to congratulate each other, all glad to be alive having had the wisdom to purchase so great a truck. and one survivor says to another, have a twinkie. [laughter] so what do we have here, but an illusion to a magnificent american myth; an urban legend taken from the very schoolyard where we've told ourselves for 50 years twinkies have a shelf life of 10 million years. [laughter] so why might p
million in 1994, below median income and new immigrant, presidents of central cities and other underserved areas and people with housing needs. reach out to every renter in america to provide information to buy a home, break down barriers, arbitrary barriers, every american wants a mortgage, will have their loan approved or put on have to get the loan approved. target the fed, new immigrants was one of the drivers for the no doc load dock years later, eliminate the final no in the mortgage application process. one much was made of wamu floating like that, if any hadden in their press release in 1994. they promised flexible underwriting standards, in other words loose lending. that is what they mean. affordable housing is another word for crop subsidies. that is what it means. fannie and freddie were famous for subsidies and well-documented by at a cafe f --fh --fhfa. the one that was the worst that politicized fannie is open 25 and in a partnership offices grew to 50 something, that will form long-term partnerships with cities, rural areas and underserved committees. political offices wa
. at the end of that first week, new york city came to him and said, 'mr. morgan, we can't meet our payroll obligations and we're gonna be bankrupt by monday.' and he managed to manufacture $100 million of clearinghouse certificates that essentially kept new york city going through the weekend. c-span: how much... >> guest: it's an amazing story. c-span: ... how much money was he worth when he died at 75 years? >> guest: approximately $80 million. that's a little low, because it was for estate --valued for estate purposes. there was no federal estate tax at the time, but there was a new york state inheritance tax. but it was under $100 million. c-span: how much is that worth today? >> guest: well, you have to multiply by 15 or 20. so if we say it's a $100 million, it would be about $1.5 million to $3 billion. and so it was a lot of money, but not nearly as much as people imagined and not as much as other wealthy men at the time had. morgan had bought out andrew carnegie when he put together us steel in 1901, for $480 million, which carnegie personally got half, so $240 million in 1901. morg
involved in everything. i think filing for divorce. city comes out with 600 pages or so. if everything arnold schwarzenegger has ever done from growing up in a time australia and the bodybuilding. pages and pages about hottie building. it is incredible -- and some is an incredible american immigrant story. he becomes a movie star and then becomes governor of california. meanwhile, this is an affair with the housekeeper about five pages in the book. and he deals with it doesn't say much, makes a mistake, regrets it in those situations. i got an interview with him on the phone friday before the book was coming out. he already agreed to be on 60 minutes and they had a lot more time. midway through the interview he said i don't -- and i cannot do arnold well. he said i don't like to read this interview is going because he thought to many questions have to do with the housekeeper, not about his accomplishments as governor. if you like arnold shorts and bigger, it's all there. it briefly made our bestseller lists and then went away. >> host: political pundits. we get the political pundits bo
in the city of boston. so just right outside this building itself. now we are going to turn to the panel discussion, which is in the fashion of a question-and-answer session. this mike in the middle of the i/o is for you to step up to, ask your questions to the panel. right now i will introduce you to the panelists. beginning with bob allison from esa chair of the history department at the university just on this tree. yes it teaches at harvard extension school in a suffered several books on the american revolution, most recently a 2011 book entitled the american revolution, a concise history. he is the vice president of the cornell society massachusetts, trustee of the uss comes to touche museum also in the freedom trail and the commonwealth to see them in boston. he also serves the bostonian society as a member of our board's advisory committee. so with that, bob alice in. [applause] >> next we'll move to jon kyl. john does a curator of the book lost in 1775 from a site dedicated to history, analysis and unabashed gossett asserted the american revolution inkling. recently completed a s
across the surface of the world in 80 days though you can fly around in our city can afford the ticket and get the password and the visas. when i returned from sea, back on land, i looks for histories around the world travel. there was none so i wrote one. now, i very quickly decided early on in the project that there was no point in trying to document all of the circumnavigation's that existed. i didn't want to write an encyclopedia. i wanted to explain why circumnavigation is distinctidistincti ve, why do we have the term around the world or circumnavigation? what do these mean? white is going around the world matter in a the broader scheme of things? it shows how human beings have been thinking for themselves on a planetary scale for a long time for nearly 500 years. this is really significant. we think a planetary consciousness is recent, something developed in modern times, something we have the people in the past didn't and we especially associate this realization of things on a planetary scale with their ongoing environmental crisis which we think of as unprecedented. but the pl
cities and on our coasts and, you know, brought me right back to square one in terms of piquing my curiosity about how all these systems fit together. not just the internet, but power and aviation and all these large, incredibly complicated things that we depend on so much. >> host: "tubes" is the name of the book, "a journey to the center of the internet," and andrew blum is the author. this is "the communicators" on c-span. >> with a month left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-end lists of notable books. booktv will feature several of these lists focusing on nonfiction selections. these nonfiction titles were included in the los angeles public library's best of 2012. salman rushdie recounts his years in hiding following a fatwa issued in 1989 for mr. rushdie's authorship of the novel, "the satanic verses." in "roger williams and the creation of the american soul: church, state and the birth of liberty," john barry recounts the life of the theologian and his thoughts on the division of religion and politics. former secretary of state madeleine albright re
right in this city even now. travels to lobby for the job. he was a burr loyalist. jefferson, not so much. one of the things i say to my hamill tone yang guys is at least my guy didn't get shot in jersey. [laughter] so, and of all the founders, the most likely to have sent shirtless e-mails is alexander hamilton. [laughter] want to get that on the record, and then we'll move on. matthew davis is sitting there pleading his case, and jefferson's looking sort of -- listening in that vaguely charming way he had. you could leave, and everyone who left his company thought he agrueled with them which was -- agreed with them which was a wonderful way to get through the moment, not such a agreement way to get through the day. and there's a fly buzzing around. and jefferson's nodding and nodding and is in eye contact with davis and goes -- grabs the fly and begins pulling it apart. [laughter] davis begins to realize this payment work out quite as well -- this may not work out quite as well as he hoped. second story. so there you have the man who can snap a fly, pull it apart and ferociously fo
century, beginning of the 14th century, venice is one of the biggest cities in europe, one of the biggest and richest and that's kind of remarkable because if you've ever been there, it's such a crummy place. rd, mosquito bitten, lagoons, very hard to build are the only reason italians ended up babies because they chased them off the good land. so yours is incredibly rich, incredibly powerful state, sending its trade mission to china, controlling creeks, lands along the croatian coast, controlling my inspiring to the italian and land. how did they do it? to the nations of this fabulous right we can still taste today, where the liquor in her to probably the most innovative and economic system at that time. they have a particular form of contract system, which allowed. unusually if you were a person willing to take on risk. even if you didn't have capital, you could share in a deal with the partner who did have capital: a trading nation in the guy who didn't have capital, but he raced his life took a share of the profits. this really was the reason you have this huge market title vicar and
the place. they're in high-rises in cities, they're in greenfield siepts out in suburban areas, they're tucked away in the back of offices, because they are the way that most commerce takes place now. so everyone has to have one. there are concentrations of them in the country. i looked in northern virginia, obviously, silicon valley's another spot, but they're really everywhere at this point. >> host: who runs them? >> guest: a variety of players. i mean, for one thing, um, companies that need these for their regular business own some of these data centers, everything from walmart to microsoft. but there's also a culture or a commerce of renting space in data centers, huge data centers, and those are lesser known names like ec by nix was mention inside the piece that will sell you time on servers. >> host: mr. glanz, what's contained within these warehouses buildings? >> guest: well, they're actually fairly boring places to visit. they're all stacked with these computers, modular computers called servers, one after the other after the other. it doesn't look like much, but they draw
the cities of europe to be destroyed it is just as what we were thinking could happen with cyber war. so we call them the lawyers and everyone agreed on a civilian targets was a war crime but fdr was not going to war but he used the moral authority for the combat since to agree right there not to bomb from the air by the end of the day he had the agreement from everybody they all agreed they would not bomb from the air with civilian targets there was announcements and penalties intel about one year into the war churchill said i will show you how that works when the docks were hit now we will balm berlin. hither says one bomb on berlin is 100 dog london and announces the blitz and destroy as london from the air. the british and the americans by the end of the war no one had the nerve to bring charges of nuremberg for the civilian bombing from the air. that tells us even with the agreement how those laws would play out. we could not contain a cyber war any more than bombing from the air. so we are a nation of fools it will not protect us in a significant way. to create a significant problem h
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23